How to Use Scrapbooking Eyelets – The Most Popular of Scrapbooking Embellishments

Scrapbooking Eyelets

Eyelets are the new craze in scrapbooking. See what the fuss is all about.

About Eyelets

Eyelets are embellishments used for scrapbooking and other craft projects such as card making. Eyelets are generally made of aluminum or brass and come in two sizes and three types. The most common size for eyelets is 1/8″, although they also come in 3/16″. 3/16″ eyelets are larger than 1/8″ eyelets and generally cost more.

Types of eyelets include plain, top coat, and anodized. Plain eyelets are not painted so they are the color of the metal they are made out of. This type of eyelets is not very common. Eyelets also come with a top coat color. These eyelets are painted. The last type of eyelet is anodized. Anodized eyelets have a more metallic color than eyelets with a top coat.

Eyelets have a hole through the center that is used to attach them to your paper. Brads are often sold with eyelets. Brads differ because they do not have this characteristic hole. Instead, brads have two metal flaps on the back that can be bent to attach them to paper.

Where to Use Eyelets

Eyelets come in many shapes and colors. They can be used to attach items such as ribbons, paper, pictures, and tags to scrapbooking pages. Eyelets are a simple way to add to the color and theme of your scrapbooking pages.

Here are 15 ideas for using your eyelets.

  1. Embellishments on a paper piecing picture such as buttons on a snowman or dots on a lady bug
  2. Attach vellum paper
  3. To hange tags or frames from
  4. Create movable parts on your paper piecing
  5. Create a page theme such as shells for a beach page or fish for a fishing trip page
  6. Corners of picture mats
  7. In the hole of a tag
  8. As bullets for a list
  9. Journaling accents
  10. Eyes of animals such as owls
  11. The center of flowers
  12. Create your own bugs, butterflies,or bees from eyelet shapes
  13. As the dot on an i or the center of a letter
  14. To make a string of Christmas lights or as the ornaments on a christmas tree
  15. The M&Ms in M&M cookies
  16. String ribbon or craft fibbers through a line of eyelets

The list could go on and on. You can use eyelets to add dimension that will spice up any page.

How to Use Eyelets

It is time to roll up those sleeves and break out your handy tools. You will need a hammer, hole setter, and a resilient work surface such as a rubber craft mat to get started using eyelets.

  1. Place your scrapbooking page face up on your work surface.
  2. Put the hole setter on your page where you want to insert the eyelet.
  3. Lightly tap the end of the hole setter a few times until a hole is created.
  4. Place your eyelet upside down on your work surface and put your scrapbooking page over the eyelet so that the back of the eyelet sticks throught the hole you just created.
  5. Place the setter with the flat end over the back of the eyelet and lightly tap the end of the setter with your hammer until the back of the eyelet begins to bend outward.
  6. Hammer the back of the eyelet directly until the eyelet flattens down into place.
  7. Turn your scrapbooking page over and be proud of your work.

Where to Buy Eyelets

You can purchase eyelets from me! My eBay Scrapbooking Store has hundreds of mixes of eyelets. Just look for my seller id: scrapsandcrafts

ScrapbookFinds.com has a search engine for finding scrapbooking eyelets, brads, and other supplies. Try it out.

Lisa Robbins is a businesswoman and an enthusiast for sports, family, and crafts. She is the creator and maintainer of ScrapsAndCrafts.com, a scrapbooking tutorial and wholesale scrapbooking supply website. She is also a contributor to ScrapbookFinds.com, a search tool for scrapbooking products

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lisa_Robbins
http://EzineArticles.com/?How-to-Use-Scrapbooking-Eyelets—The-Most-Popular-of-Scrapbooking-Embellishments&id=151036

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>